Posts tagged ‘Long Beach’

June 24, 2015

Spotlight Theatre Club hosts Williams’ films

By Krista Brooks

Thursday, February 26, 2015 LBCC VIking Newspaper

http://www.lbccviking.com/archives/3111

The Spotlight Theatre Club presented a double-feature movie night Friday evening, Feb. 20, to raise money for the Trevor Project and to honor late actor, Robin Williams.

The Trevor Project is a national organization that focuses on providing services of crisis relief, specializing in suicide prevention to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24.

Co-Vice President of the Spotlight Theatre Club Donna Thaing, 22, said, “Robin Williams was always doing work for other people, so we didn’t feel like it was right to keep the money for our benefit, we wanted to give back the way he had.”

Rory Kennedy, 23, a theatre arts major, watched “Dead Poets Society” for the first time that night. “With his comedic background, movies like this open the audience’s eyes at how talented he was as a performer in drama, he could do anything,” he said.

The movie night raised $91.54 and the club plans to donate $200 to the Trevor Project.

Mendelez said, “It was a great way to celebrate his work and life while raising awareness for suicide prevention.”

December 11, 2012

CSULB is catching up with others by offering queer studies minor

Rainbow flag. Symbol of gay pride.

Rainbow flag. Symbol of gay pride. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Krista Brooks

Published Tuesday, November 27, 2012 – The Daily 49er

http://www.daily49er.com/opinion/csulb-is-catching-up-with-others-by-offering-queer-studies-minor-1.2797562#.UMadc7_8PXU

The Cal State University Academic Senate and Cal State Long Beach Academic Senate has approved a new minor for the university, queer studies.

The idea for the minor was developed by Jennifer Reed, an associate professor within the women’s, gender and sexuality studies department.

Reed is also a member of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Task Force. She has mentioned that the term “queer” is not offensive, it is only an umbrella word in academia to include a wide range of sexuality.

The minor took about two years to be approved. Students in pursuit of this major will be required to take an introduction to queer studies course and a queering gender course. The other elective courses offered next fall under the women’s, gender and sexual studies department will include: gender and sexuality in Asian America; American Indian genders and sexualities; critical issues in Chicana and Latina studies; gender, sexuality, and desire in world history context and reproductive justice.

It’s 2012, and we finally have an academic minor for queer studies. A major would have been nice to make up for our school being completely behind the times, but this is the first step.

Dina Peroone, an assistant professor of sex, sexuality, crime and punishment, said she supports this minor and feels that it is imperative to inform students about this subject for life in the real world.

Queer studies is a critical approach to studies based on issues including sexual orientation, gender identity, the LGBT community and culture. The minor includes academic study in categories such as biology, sociology, psychology, political science and ethics.

Considering that we have a large LGBT community and pride parade in Long Beach, I would have assumed we would have this by now.

Our neighboring schools, Cal State Fullerton and Cal State Northridge, already offer degrees in the same field.

Other California schools offer degrees and certificates. Humboldt State University offers a multicultural queer studies minor. The University of California, Berkeley offers an LGBT studies minor. The University of California, Santa Barbara offers a queer studies minor in their department of feminist studies, and San Francisco State University offers an LGBT studies minor through its LGBT program.

I can understand SFSU beating us to the punch, but we are clearly a city of many cultures with a large community that appeals to this minor.

I am proud that we will have the option next year for this minor. I hope to see it become a major soon with more classes and options.

Krista Brooks is a junior journalism major and the assistant opinions editor for the Daily 49er.

November 24, 2012

Thanksgiving is a time for giving back to the local community

By Krista Brooks

Published Tuesday, November 20, 2012 – The Daily 49er

http://www.daily49er.com/opinion/thanksgiving-is-a-time-for-giving-back-to-the-local-community-1.2796398#.ULEZ4oenKa8

Thanksgiving is almost here, a day of turkey, family appreciation and togetherness. It’s the transition into colder weather, finals and ultimately winter holidays and vacation. Thursday is the day when we celebrate what we are thankful for.

This year, don’t wait until the donation bins are around town as Santa rings his bell for petty change. The money you are planning to spend on either Black Friday or Cyber Monday could help provide support to those unfortunate enough to be missing out on the Thanksgiving feast tradition. Your money or time can help locals in your neighborhood, HurricaneSandy victims or the troops fighting for our country overseas.

There are several ways to help provide support. Your second plate or abundant leftovers each year could amount to feeding several in need.

Long Beach has been active this season in providing food around the city. Several churches have held food drives to collect dinners for others.

One church offered 1,000 residents and homeless women from shelters clothes, advice and free haircuts along with their meal. Another church distributed donated produce and turkey, feeding more than 700 locals.

A group of local hotels provided food to combine two large Thanksgiving feasts in the park. The Westin and Renaissance hotels joined with the Hilton, Hyatt and Hotel Maya to provide dinner in City Councilman Dee Andrew’s event “Serving With a Thankful Heart.”

Those who are in shape and want to help raise money can do so in the Turkey Trot.

Long Beach holds an annual Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving morning for all ages, ranging from a half-mile course to a10K. Run or walk, it doesn’t matter. It is just for a good cause.

The Community Action Team returns the money raised to the community and areas of need. This year will be the 10thannual trot, held in Belmont Shores.

In the Los Angeles area, there is a higher need for volunteers to meet the needs of the many shelters and kitchens.

Throughout this week and next, the LA Regional Food Bank is encouraging volunteers to assist assembling food packages of donated food.

For more ways to find out where and how you can help, visit volunteermatch.org.

Even if you don’t choose one of the aforementioned methods of helping, find it within you this holiday to spread love and support by any means that you can.

Krista Brooks is a junior journalism major and the assistant opinions editor for the Daily 49er.

 

November 19, 2012

Prop 38 vs Prop 30 two enter, only one or none can survive

By Krista Brooks

Published Monday, October 22, 2012 – The Daily 49er

http://www.daily49er.com/opinion/prop-30-versus-prop-38-two-enter-only-one-or-none-can-survive-1.2782203#.UKnIYIenKa8

Election time is approaching fast. Now is the time to research, to focus our interests and make a decision on which propositions and candidates to choose.

We’ve all heard of Proposition 30, hopefully. This initiative will directly affect our campus and student population.

Gov. Jerry Brown has supported his state’s education system this year by approving the merger of two initiatives: the “Millionaire’s Tax” and “Brown’s First Tax Increase Proposal.” Prop. 30 will impact universities, community colleges and K-12 schools in California.

It will raise sales tax from 7.25 percent to 7.50 percent for seven years. The personal income tax increase will affect taxpayers earning an excess of $250,000. These tax increases will be distributed, 89 percent to K-12 schools and 11 percent to community colleges. This is a way to help balance the ongoing budget crisis by having the wealthy bracket in our state give back to its youth for prosperity.

If this fails to pass, the Cal State University system will face a cut of $250 million. For CSULB, our tuition will rise by at least 5 percent. In the case that Prop. 30 passes, students will be reimbursed for this semester’s tuition hike.

Yes, it’s true! We will be paid!

The money credited to a student’s bill or bank account will be about $498.

Our university prepared for potential cuts like this one last year and raised the tuition prior to the election year to make the potential increase less severe to students.

Prop. 30 runs into a catch-22 situation because it intersects with a related initiative, Prop. 38. “Our Children, Our Future: Local Schools and Early Education Investment Act” will increase taxes for 12 years, if not reauthorized. These tax increases will affect all taxpayers earning more than $7,316. This means more people will have to pay, and for a longer time period than Prop. 30.

During the first four years, these collected taxes will be distributed, 60 percent to K-12 schools, 10 percent to early child development programs and 30 percent to repay our state’s debt.

Prop. 38 is very similar to Prop. 30 with the same hopes to give back to the state’s educational system and youth. So why is it a catch-22?
Only one of these propositions can pass this year. If both pass, the proposition with the greater number of votes will be instated and the other will be thrown out.

This competition between the two propositions should be a boost of motivation to make sure voters’ voices are heard.

Even though the two are competing, they are both similar in the fact that they will help our state’s budget and education system.

However, the tax increase will affect more wallets with Prop. 38, and its failure will not lower the funding already promised to these educational facilities, as Prop. 30 would for universities in California.

Krista Brooks is a junior journalism major and the assistant opinions editor for the Daily 49er.

October 17, 2012

Gas prices should not affect the upcoming presidential election

By Krista Brooks

Published Tuesday, October 9, 2012 – The Daily 49er

Yesterday gas prices in CA rose to an average high of $4.66 a gallon.

This means that California’s average gas price has risen to be higher than that of the nation’s former most expensive gas state, Hawaii, which is $4.39.

The regular gas price average in the U.S. is $3.81 currently, but the cheapest available gas in Long Beach as of yesterday was $4.54.

The highest price reached $4.92 at one point.

Whoa.

Gas has almost become $5 per gallon here in Long Beach.

This is surprising because gas prices normally go down before an election.

In California alone, we are paying towards gas typically 40 to 50 cents more per gallon than anywhere else in the country.

For years, many have pinned the gas price hikes on the sitting U.S. president, blaming him for mishandling the situation.

Even so, gas prices do not greatly affect the vote when election season finally rolls around.

As of last year, the U.S. supply of oil increased the most since 1970.

Under President Obama’s term, the amount of drilling for oil has escalated for 10 percent of the country’s current demand.

According to the Republican Party’s independent energy campaign, the prices in gas will increase if Mitt Romney is elected. While prices will rise, more jobs will be created for drilling, and more oil will be available.

However, as we can see with the Obama administration, the increase of the amount of drilling and oil will not lower these outrageously high prices.

Just as before, prices are more than likely to escalate if we drill more.

As enticing as it is to exclaim “drill baby drill,” the odds are demand will remain the same and be ineffective in lowering prices.

Beyond rising prices, the current gas situation has turned several desperate drivers into thieves. In Roseville, Calif., there were about 1,100 gallons of gas stolen from a Shell station, worth more than $4,500. These gas thieves were caught, yet only 1000 gallons were recovered.

These prices are higher in CA due to a fire at the Chevron Richmond refinery in August, which reduced oil production. This refinery supplies 8.5% of total petroleum products to the Petroleum Administration for Defense District 5, which includes CA.

Prices have also escalated from the organic chloride contamination that shut down the Kelleman-Los Medanos pipeline, which proved 85,000 barels or crude oil a day to supply the San Francisco Bay Area.

We experienced another setback yesterday in our local area, Torrance, CA. The ExxonMobil refinery that supplies 149,000 barrels daily to the LA area suffered from a power outage shut down.

Due to these setback and shutdowns, the low supply will hurt our wallets for hopefully just a bit longer. Energy experts predict that lower-quality gasoline may be introduced to our state, which other US states have already taken advantage of. This gas will cause more pollution, but will ease the severe spike in price. Our state already has high levels of pollution, and this gas should be used only temporarily.

Despite setbacks at the pump, hopefully California residents will be able to separate gas prices from the real issues when voting in this election.

Krista Brooks is a junior journalism major and the assistant opinions editor for the Daily 49er.

September 5, 2012

Our View: Carbon emissions taxes will sink CSU budget

Se below

By Krista Brooks

Published Tuesday, August 28, 2012The Daily 49er

http://www.daily49er.com/opinion/our-view-carbon-emissions-taxes-will-sink-csu-budget-1.2753845#.UEaoufXueSo

Effective Jan. 1, 2013, a cap and trade program will be implemented, affecting the Cal State University and University of California, and forcing the systems to pay the price for high levels of carbon emissions.

These facilities will be charged a fee for emitting greenhouse gases.

Either go green or pay the green. Cap and trade is a solution projected to reduce California’s carbon emissions by a substantial amount.

The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, also known as Assembly Bill 32, mandates the state reduce the level of carbon emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020.

University of California, Los Angeles is projected to pay the most — up to $8.4 million.

The rate of carbon credits is predicted to range from $10 to $40 each.

The resulting fee for both university systems could be as much as $28 million a year.

But this can, and will rise.

The legislation, once in place, will have no limit on how much tax credits would cost at a given time.

The choice to reduce carbon emissions is essentially optional.

Businesses with the money can continue to emit as much greenhouse gases as they want, as long as they buy the appropriate amount of credits. Only when a business can’t afford to will it be forced to change its behavior. Businesses without the extra cash or capability of lowering emissions will have to face the consequences.

We can only hope the fee is too much for big business to ignore. Small businesses have no choice.

As for us students in the CSU and UC systems, we will pay the price. The $28 million in potential fees is just another expense to tack onto our budget and our campuses will be affected regardless of how far our efforts go to lower emissions.

Long Beach has taken several steps to lower our carbon footprint already. Not only is the city becoming more and more bike-friendly, it has taken action in improving public transportation.

Many buses are now hybrids and routes have been extended to accommodate more public transporters.

All plastic bags have been banned from grocery stores in Long Beach and paper bag alternatives cost 10 cents each. This encourages shoppers to use reusable bags instead of disposable bags.

Cal State Long Beach has incorporated water fountains on campus specifically to refill water bottles and canteens, which lowers the amount of plastic bottles.

These improvements were made by the city of Long Beach and CSULB, before the threat of a fee.

The steps taken towards a greener city should be rewarded rather than taxed. With dismal state support, this bill will continue to suck us dry of every last penny.

May 18, 2012

The Next Step in Evolution (Origami Style)

Following the story of evolution and how humans have impacted their environment.
A student project at Cal State Long Beach, (made with paper puppets by journalism students with little to no origami skills.)

November 1, 2011

Beach News Episode 3

Videography for segment “Battle of the Beats” & Reporter for “Halloween Horror Nights”

Online Oct. 6, 2011 – Beach News

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